My Passion for Greek Mythology

Ever since I was a little girl, I always enjoyed the Greek Mythology. Maybe because of the idea of powers.

Aphrodite was my first favorite because she’s the supposed to be the most beautiful of all.

Then Athena, God of Battle Strategy and Wisdom.

And last is Artemis, God of because she’s also known as Diana, and my name is Dianne. Then I encountered the star and Queen Cassiopeia and the rest was history.

I always loved the Greek Mythology especially part in the story of Helen of Troy. I sympathise so much with Hector and Paris’s father. His people have lost everything to Agamemnon just because of Helen, the face that sailed a thousand ships as the movie would say.

My next favorite story was somehow in my memory. I hated every way Hades was portrayed in several Greek Mythology movies or series because they always make him the villain, when he isn’t really. But, I love Hades and Persephone’s story.

I thought it was romantic maybe because I also thought of Persephone as a mortal and it’s big deal to be notice by a God. Their story was even in my literature book. I think what I read or remembered is the different version. In my mind, that was always the version.

The story I know is that Hades was wooing Persephone and he took her to the Underworld, but she wasn’t aware that she’s the Lord or God of the Underworld. And that he tricked her into eating the Pomegranate seeds which is why she needed to stay there as his wife for four months and go back to her mother and stay with her for eight months.

I only realized the correct version when I decided to read it again in College from this old book in our home. I don’t know who owns it. It’s just in our shelves. Well here’s the original version so far. It’s the same story but longer version in my book.

The myth of Hades and Persephone also has a different version; in this one Demeter was present when Persephone was kidnapped by God Hades but was tricked by Zeus and Hades.

That morning when Demeter descended on Earth with her daughter Persephone , she left her to play with the sea nymphs called Nereids and the Naiads who were the freshwater nymphs of the lakes, springs and rivers.

Demeter went to supervise her bountiful crops. As Persephone engaged in play and with the rest of the group, her attention fell upon the potently fragrant valley nearby and she couldn’t take her eyes of the yellow flower narcissus. She called upon her playmates to accompany her, but they couldn’t possibly go with her as leaving the side of their water bodies would result in their death.

The flower Narcissus was planted there by Gaia, who was following the orders of Zeus. The goal was to enchant Persephone and attract her, away from her guides.

The flower Narcissus was planted there by Gaia, who was following the orders of Zeus. The goal was to enchant Persephone and attract her, away from her guides.

So, Persephone danced her way to the garden alone and tried to pluck the narcissus from the bosom of Gaia. It drained her energies as the narcissus only came out after a lot of pulling. But suddenly, to her utter fright, she saw the tiny hole from which she had drawn out the flower shaft, began to rapid grow in size until it started to resemble a mighty enormous chasm.

From this came the vigorous galloping sounds of multiple horses and such sudden happenings only froze the frail beauty to her feet. Out of all her friends only the naiad Cyane tried to rescue the crying Persephone but she was no match for the powerful Hades. Bereaving her friend’s kidnap, Cyane melted into a pool of tears and formed the river Cyane at the spot.

Persephone’s mother, Demeter, begged her brother Hades to allow Persephone to come back to the livings, denoting that the young Persephone was not supposed to live in the underworld. Hades consulted with Zeus and they both decided to allow Persephone to live on earth for six months each year, while the rest of the time she would be on his side in the Underworld.

Before leaving the underworld, Persephone had been persuaded to eat four seeds of a pomegranate. In ancient mythology, to eat the fruit of one’s captor meant that one would have to return to that captor or country, so Persephone was doomed to return to the underworld for four months of the year. But she was allowed to spend the remaining two-thirds of the year with her Earth Mother, Demeter.

The myth of Hades and Persephone is associated with the coming of Spring and Winter: When Persephone comes to the Earth, it’s springtime. When she descends to Hades, it is winter.

If you want to know more about the Myth just click the link above.

Here’s another good story and more information about Hades and Persephone.

I also grew up watching the series Hercules, and Xena, the Warrior Princess. I always loved Xena’s technique where she will hit something in the neck, the person will have a hard time breathing then eventually die. If he answers her questions, she’ll have to hit him again so he can breath again.

Fast forward to now, I forgot my passion for Greek Mythology, because I went to College and focused on my career, and my dreams.

Then I saw Hades again in Once Upon A Time and remembered how much I liked his and Persephone’s story and it made me re-read every Greek Mythology book and literature in my Grandfather’s house. My passion for Greek Mythology is back with a vengeance.

And last, but not the least, I just saw the movie, Wonder Woman. I just love her back story, how she became who she was. I love the fighting stunts. Damn, the amazon casts we’re all amazing. And I just love the epic God to God battle with Ares. It doesn’t disappointment.

I especially love how the theme of the movie focused on love and what the mortal or immortal believed in.

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